Wednesday, June 27, 2007

A picture's worth....

They say that a picture is worth a thousand words- I think that is refering to those once-in-a-life-time shots, but since I have more pictures than I have time to tell about them, I hope you enjoy a little look at what is keeping us busy around here!
Swimming...

Trapping preditors, (hopefully before they eat our birds )

gardening...

chores...

wrestling the toy arch...

Enjoying the beauty God has given us all around!

(Photographers- question here. I have heard that taking pictures without the flash is better, it captures the depth better. But these last 2 pictures were seconds apart and I like the colors in the bottom one, (with flash) better. Why?)







4 comments:

~AliisaJoy~ said...

The pictures of the sunset are GORGEOUS!!! The little boys are really cute :)

I have no clue about the picture question, but I am curious to find out the answer!

Bethany said...

Some fun sunset pictures, Lydia! Just curious -- which picture did the sunset really look like?! :D

Your question made me think. I don't know for sure what the correct answer would be, but my assumption is that in the top photo it read the sun as your 'light,' thus lightening the whole effect of the picture.

Whereas when you turned the flash on, it read as light whatever was in the distance your flash reads -- thus make the background (sunset) much more dark and brilliant (silhouette effect).

Did any of that make sense? :D

~Bryant said...

I was way overdue visiting your blog! I really enjoyed all the pictures and posts! Paul and Marcus are so cute! :-)

Christopher said...

The top sunset picture (without flash) was exposed for 1/10 of a second. The bottom one, with flash, was exposed for 1/60 second.

Basically, for the first picture the camera saw more dark areas than light areas and set the exposure accordingly. This resulted in the light areas being overexposed.

On the second picture, my guess is 1/60 is the minimum exposure the camera is programmed to use when the flash is engaged. It just happened in this instance that 1/60 was the right exposure for the light areas in the sky.

To achieve the proper exposure for sunset photographs without resorting to manual controls, you could try zooming in or otherwise framing the image so that as much of the frame is filled with the light areas of the sky as possible (including some horizon for a silhouette in the bottom of the frame is okay, however. But I recommend it should take up no more than a third of the frame).